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Plumtree Mead, Loughton, Essex. IG10 1TT

£320,000 3 bedrooms 1 bathrooms

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  • Overview
  • Floorplan
  • Brochure
  • EPC
  • Map
  • Street View
  • Nearby
  • Directions
  • Planning Permission Granted to Extend
  • Currently a Three Bedroom Semi Detached House
  • Plans to Convert to Four Bedroom House
  • Side and rear extensions Agreed.
  • Cash Buyers Only
  • Located in a peaceful Cul De Sac
  • Additional information
  • Reception Rooms 1
  • Style Semi Detached
  • Garden Yes
  • Parking No
  • Conservatory No
  • Renovation No

Full description

Cash Buyer Only
With planning permission granted to turn this project house into a 4 bedroom family home makes this is a fantastic investment opportunity. The permitted extensions are over two floors to the side and rear and would allow for four bedrooms, two receptions along with a large kitchen diner. Located in a quiet Cul-De-Sac this family home falls within some great school catchments and is close to local amenities along with a Central Line tube station.

Something About Loughton.
Loughton is a town in the Epping Forest District of Essex and is located south of the M25 and west of the M11 motorway and has boundaries with Chingford, Waltham Abbey, Theydon Bois, Chigwell and Buckhurst Hill. Loughton includes three conservation areas and there are 56 listed buildings in the town, together with a further 50 that are locally listed.

The earliest structure in Loughton is Loughton Camp, an Iron Age earth fort in Epping Forest dating from around 500 BC. Hidden by dense undergrowth for centuries it was rediscovered in 1872.

The first references to the site of modern-day Loughton date from the Anglo-Saxon period when it was known as Lukintune ("the farm of Luhha"). The earliest written evidence of this settlement is in the charter of Edward the Confessor in 1062 which granted various estates, including Tippedene (Debden) and Alwartune (Alderton Hall, in Loughton), to Harold Godwinson (later King Harold II) following his re-founding of Waltham Abbey. Following the Norman conquest, the town is also mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086, with the name Lochintuna. The arrival of the railway spurred on the town's development. The railway first came to Loughton in 1856 when the Eastern Counties Railway, (later the Great Eastern Railway), opened a branch line via Woodford. In 1948 the line was electrified and transferred to London Transport to become part of the Central line on the London Underground. The arrival of the railway also provided visitors from London with a convenient means of reaching Epping Forest and thus transforming it into the "East Enders' Playground".

More recently In 2002 Loughton featured in the ITV1 programme Essex Wives, a documentary series about the lives of some of the nouveau riche who have resided in the Essex satellite towns of London since the 1980s. Journalists' use of the term "golden triangle" to describe the towns of Loughton, Buckhurst Hill and Chigwell for their propensity to attract wealthy footballers, soap-opera actors and TV celebrities as residents derives from this. The town has been used as a backdrop in other television series, notably The Only Way is Essex, and two shops in the High Road are associated with members of its cast.In 2016, Loughton was assessed as the third best ethnically integrated town in the country, as reported by the local newspaper.

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